BLACK FRIDAY GIVEAWAY! GET A FREE EYEPIECE CARRY CASE ON ORDERS $400 & UP! *offer is automatically added to qualifying orders*

Top 8 Telescopes for Kids in 2020

To this day, I remember the first time I viewed the moon through a telescope. I was 8 years old and I was obsessed with trying to find the craters arranged to make the face of the “man on the moon”. I felt like I had discovered something magical! Here we are decades later and I can still remember it clear as day. 

 

If you have a curious young mind in your household, a telescope may just be the perfect gift! You may end up with a future scientist on your hands. At the very least, you’ll have hours of entertainment for parents and kids alike and shared memories that will last a lifetime.

 

The perfect telescope for a child is a balancing act. Assuming they’ll go through a bit of wear and tear, you’ll want something more rugged that’s not a big financial investment. Quality is also paramount. If a telescope is poorly made and relatively useless, your kid’s interest will fade quicker than you can say “nebula”.

 

Telescopes vary greatly in both capability and complexity. A telescope that’s perfect for a 7-year-old may not challenge and excite a 13-year-old! We’ve put together a comprehensive list of the best telescopes for kids in 2020 - broken down by age group to make sure your child gets the right fit. 

 

 

Ages 6 and under:

Educational Insights GeoSafari Jr

 

 

Why We Love It:

  • The 10x magnification provides fantastic views of the moon while keeping the field of vision wide, which is essential for young childrens' understanding of magnified views.
  • Two large eyepieces mimic a binocular which makes it easy for even the youngest of children to use.
  • Adjustable tripod legs allow for easy tabletop use
  • Easy setup and no mirror focusing required
  • Inexpensive! $34.99 

 

Things To Consider:

  • Limited capability. Perfect for our young ones but kids over the age of 6 will likely be excited by a more advanced telescope

 

Shop Now

 

Nancy B’s Science Club® MoonScope 

 

Why We Love It:

  • Their website recommends this for children ages 8-12, but I think it would be perfectly fine for younger kids with some parental assistance
  • Includes a moon filter, 2 eyepieces (18x and 90x magnification) and a built in finder-scope
  • Comes with the Sky Gazers Journal which includes stories about the moon and observation activities

 

Things To Consider:

  • Requires AAA batteries, not included
  • May have to adjust the focuser knob until image is clear

 

Shop Now

 

 

Ages 6-10:

Levenhuk LabZZ T3 Telescope

 

Why We Love It:

  • 175x magnification power will yield views of Solar System planets and the moon
  • Includes everything you need - 4mm and 12.5mm eyepieces, 1.5x erecting eyepiece, 3x Barlow lens, 5x optical finder, diagonal mirror, & aluminum tripod with accessory tray 
  • Will yield views enjoyable for kids and parents alike
  • Under $100! Only $69.95 & Free Shipping

 

Things To Consider:

  • This is a refractor telescope, meaning it will be best for viewing the planets and the moon. If your child is interested in nebulae and galaxies, a reflector telescope would be a better choice
  • Assembly is required

 

Shop Now

 

 

MaxUSee Kids Telescope 400x40mm Portable Telescope for Kids & Beginners

 

Why We Love It:

  •  Low tripod height is perfect for tabletop use and easy transportation
  • Refractor telescope is great for viewing planets of the solar system and the moon
  • Includes 6mm, 12.5mm and 20mm eyepieces, finder scope, moon mirror, compass, and a stars and moon map
  • Price! Only $37.99

Thing To Consider:

  • May need some daytime adjustments to center the finder scope 

Shop Now

 

ExploreOne Juno 50mm AZ Telescope

 

Why We Love It:

  • This refractor telescope is great for daytime and nighttime viewing
  • Yields views of the moon's cratered surface, Jupiter's moons and Saturns rings
  • Includes 2 eyepieces, star map and astronomy software for navigation
  • Also comes with a hard case for easy transportation and storage!
  • Price: $49.99

 

Things To Consider:

  • Some mentioned that the locking mechanism could be sturdier

 

Shop Now

 

Ages 10 & Up

Levenhuk Skyline Travel 70

 

Why We Love It:

  • Great for both astronomic and terrestrial viewing
  •  Will give great views of the lunar craters, polar caps on Mars, and rings of Saturn
  • Easy-to-use rotation of the alt-azimuth mount
  • Magnification up to 120x
  • Includes 2 eyepieces, optical finder, diagonal prism, and 3x barlow lens
  • Also comes with a backpack for storage and transportation!
  • Price under $100! $89.95

Things To Consider:

  • Refractor telescopes are great for lunar and planetary observations. If your child is more interested in deep-sky observations a reflector will be the best choice 

 

Shop Now

 

 

Celestron PowerSeeker 127EQ Reflector

 

Why We Love It:

  • This is a great telescope for a kid who is serious about exploring the deep sky! 
  • Includes 4mm and 20mm eyepieces, 3x Barlow lens, and an astronomy software package.
  • Equatorial mount has slow motion controls that make it easy to track your target
  • Adjustable, full height tripod
  • Easy setup, no tools required
  • Price: $169.95

 

Things To Consider:

  • Reflectors require regular collimation (alignment of the mirrors). Collimation is easy once you've done it a few times but your child will probably need your assistance. 

 

Shop Now

 

 

Carson 15x-37.6x SkySeeker Newtonian Reflector

 

Why We Love It:

  • This is a reflector telescope, which means it is an excellent option for deep-sky observations like the Orion Nebulae, Hercules Cluster, and Andromeda Galaxy
  • Dobsonian mount is stable and can easily be used on a tabletop
  • Includes 8mm and 20mm eyepieces
  • Preassembled and ready to use right out of the box
  • Price: $127.99

 

Things To Consider:

  • Due to the reflector's open-tube design, dust may gather and will need to be gently cleaned with a feather duster or pressurized air

 

Shop Now

 

Did this article give you the answers you needed? And if your child already has their first telescope, which one would you recommend? 

 

Let me know in the comments!

 

Also, if you know someone who can benefit from this post, be sure to send them a link.

 

If you liked this post and want to get more posts just like this, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter in the footer below. 

 

Until next time!

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published